How to get a serving job

So let’s go over some points of attack when it comes to you applying for a serving position. First you should decide on what type of restaurant you want to work at. Is it a cafe? a hotel restaurant? a fast food joint? a pub? function or banquet venue? on a cruise ship?. There are many more different variations of serving jobs and each different one should have a resume tailored to give you the best chance of getting the job. So let’s get to the beginning of how to get a serving job.

Applying for a server position.

If you’ve never worked as a server before you will be better off to look for a restaurant which will provide you with well structured training. These are places such as Boston Pizza, Applebee’s, TGI fridays etc. These types of restaurants will generally consider hiring people with little to no experience as it allows their training to be taught to someone who hasn’t been corrupted by other places “sloppy” or “wrong” standards. However with these places you may have to start off as a busser or host/hostess before starting as a server.

If you have trouble getting a serving job with these places you may need to start somewhere like Mc’Donalds or Burger King or something like a fast food chain. Although you’re not really “serving” in these places they do have amazing and precise training (which will benefit you later when serving tables) and will help you with your people interaction skills. Even just a few months working for one of these fast food chains will look good to an employer at one those entry-level restaurants mentioned above.

(be sure that when applying for a serving job you avoid the peak times of a restaurant. Lunch is generally between the hours 12pm – 3pm and dinner between 6pm – 9pm. It looks very bad when someone tries to apply for a job during these times)

If you would prefer to start at a higher level like I mentioned above you can always apply at a restaurant as a busser or host/hostess. This way you can observe and learn the ways of the restaurant your working in and then after some time show your interest in wanting to serve, and be sure to let your manager know that you would like to work towards being a server, they don’t know and won’t consider you unless you make them aware of it.

Important aspect (You!)
Now for most places it’s going to be your personality which will play a big role in getting the job or not. You have to be relaxed and yourself, don’t feed them the answers you “think” that they want to hear and don’t try to be someone who you’re not because it will be revealed eventually if you do get the job. Skills and procedures can be taught but you and your personality cannot be.

You’re better off trying to speak with a manager.
You want to try speak directly with a manager if you want the best chances of getting the job. Simply handing your application or resume to a host/hostess, bartender or server can end up in the trash, in a pile with the other applications or simply just lost. Your time with the manager gives you your moment to shine and to give them a good first impression.

The kinds of questions you might be asked in an interview are:
Why should I hire you?
What do you know about us?
Do you work well in a team?
What’s your favorite dish here? (Quickly browse a menu before an interview)
The kitchen ran out of fish. What would you suggest as an alternative? (another reason to browse a menu quickly before)
What alcohol would you offer to two men in a business meeting?
A guest is angry, what do you do?
Another servers table asks you for some water, do you tell their server or do would you bring it to them?
A guest orders an alcoholic beverage and shows their Student ID and bank card, do you serve them the drink?
Someone gives you a fake ID, how would you approach this situation?
Another servers table is complaining about that server to you, what do you do?
Now these are just some examples that I have seen and heard over the years. Interviews are always different, you might have to fill out a questionnaire, submit an application online or sit down with someone in person. Regardless of which one it is it’s good to be prepared for any of the above.

Your resume.
If you haven’t got a resume together then I suggest you get on top of that pronto because without it you won’t even be looked at. If you don’t know how to write a resume then I suggest you grab a template and input your information in the spaces. You can download a free resume template.

Oh and one final tip I can give you is to dress nice. Don’t go in with a mini skirt (boys or girls) or in a pair of shorts and a shirt. Once again your first impression is the thing that could get you the job or not. 

Thanks!

Nathan

Source: http://howtobeagoodserver.com/

Dear Waitress Confessions : Applying for a Job as a Waitress Without Experience

Dear Waitress Confessions…

“Hi there!

I decided to contact you because I am looking to start waitressing. I read some of your posts and found your stories really  interesting. I just moved to a new city (Calgary Alberta) and was wanting to try out something I would not back home, waitressing.

I’m not someone that goes to the bar often but would to get more comfortable to the restaurant environment. Can you give me some recommendations how I can start? My previous experience was in customer service. This would be a part time opportunity for me.

How should I approach or find an opportunity? Should my resume be different than my bank opportunity? How should I dress for an interview? How do I know if a restaurant want me to wear a certain type of clothing I’m not comfortable with, example Moxies. Thank you so much for your time, hope you can help me with overcoming this experience.”  ~Kitty

Dear Kitty…

First off, thank you so much for taking the time to write!

Part time waitressing is great, especially if you are just looking for make some extra cash on the side.  Since this would be your first experience waitressing, you may have to opt for “less fancier” restaurants.  Higher end restaurants ask for years of experience and it is very competitive.

The best approach, in my own opinion, would be to look for places that are willing to hire based on your experience working in customer service.  Even if you have no servingg experience, they may be just dying to find someone who excels in that area.  That, in my opinion, is definitely worth a shot.

Your resume should reflect exactly who you are and what skills you believe you have in order to convince them to give you a chance.  Are you a good multitasker?  Are you active? Do you learn quickly? Are you great with people?  Take the time to think of the great qualities it takes to be a waitress.

As for the interview process, it could depend a lot on what type of restaurant, but I would always for for the professional look.  Wear your hair up in a very professional, clean cut way if you have long hair.  Working in the restaurant business, you always need to have your hair tied up.  It will give them the chance to see what you would look like that way.

Upon entering a restaurant, have a pen ready, ask to speak with the manager and be really nice to the hostess since they will be the one who is going between you and the manager.  If you’re rude to her and if she is very close and open with the manager, she may tell him that you aren’t worth his time and miss out.  Find out when the quiet hours are to go in order to meet the manager/owner face to face, because there is nothing worse to a manager than having someone come in during a rush. Do NOT be that person…shows you don’t know how the restaurant business works.  Call in advance to find out when the best time would be.

Smile…..A LOT!  But, you know, not in a scary way.  Ask questions and be honest.  If you’re concerned about what a restaurant would want you to wear, then ask them what the dress code is and if there are any ways around that.  If you’re not comfortable with the dress code then move on to another restaurant.  You’ll be saving yourself the trouble and won’t be wasting their time either.

Also, there is nothing that people in the restaurant hate more (ok—im exaggerating just a bit) than someone who says that they have more experience than they do.  Because they will be able to tell right away.  It’s just the way it is.

I wish you all the luck in the world!

Source: https://thewaitressconfessions.wordpress.com

How to Get a Job as a Waiter & Server

It's easy to take servers for granted when you're at a restaurant, but waiters and servers have a challenging task. Their jobs involve plenty of multitasking, advanced interpersonal skills, and grace under pressure in a high-stress, fast-paced environment. Getting a job as a waiter means that you're the link between customers and the chef, and that's not always the easiest place to be when the restaurant is busy, the chef is stressed, and the customers want their food as fast as possible.

Learn the Tricks of The Trade

1. Charm the patrons. Concise communication and a friendly, approachable demeanor are incredibly important for servers. Customers don't want a "Chatty Cathy," but they do need someone who's cordial and attentive. An essential skill for a successful server is the ability to be a "people person."

2. Hone your multitasking skills. Table 4 wants an extra ramekin of ketchup, table 7 needs a refill on a happy hour beer, and someone at table 2 said the food was cold. Servers must prioritize all those requests as well as interacting with customers to ensure a pleasant experience. You must rise above the chaos and handle many tasks at the same time.

3. Practice that penmanship. Some restaurants have transitioned to a fully digital order-taking system. However, most servers don't yet have the opportunity to take orders with an iPad, which immediately blasts the order right into the kitchen. Don't make it tough for the kitchen to read the order. Practice writing clearly and legibly.

Write a Resume and Practice the Interview

Different restaurants will have different methods of interviewing staff. Some restaurants may want to set up an appointment and talk for several minutes about your goals and experience. Other establishments might approach the hiring process informally and offer you a temporary position that will turn into a permanent job after initial training is complete.

Finding Restaurants That Fit Your Experience Level

It might seem easy to get a job as a waiter, but certain establishments won't train you and will expect that you already have experience as a server. Expensive establishments that sell more liquor than food often require a certain caliber of wait staff, and will only hire people who have worked with wealthy clientele.

Places where you'll have the easiest time getting into the restaurant business might include large nationwide chains, restaurants with limited serving requirements, and new establishments looking to build their staff. Start with these types of restaurants and you’ll have a better chance of getting hired faster.

Becoming a waiter or server is a good stepping-stone to careers that require multitasking, friendliness, and efficiency. Waiting tables is also a terrific way to prepare to own a business or manage a restaurant.

Source: https://www.livecareer.com

How to become a Chef

The humble Chef is master of all things food and business. They must have great people skills and also be organized. Most importantly, it's all about the customers. It's a tough job but it's a fulfilling career.

So how do you become a Chef? Here are steps to becoming a working Chef.

FIND A JOB WORKING IN A RESTAURANT KITCHEN
Knowing how the kitchen and restaurant works is vitally important to becoming a chef. But be warned, this first job might include the most mundane things, including washing dishes and taking out the trash. However, the exposure to professionals in the kitchen is what matters, and over time a fresh new chef will work their way up the ladder to the more appealing tasks. This time toiling in the trenches of kitchen duty will help answer the big question: Is this what you really want to do?

GET A HIGH SCHOOL DIPLOMA OR GED
In order to move on to culinary school, a high school diploma will be required. It might also be required by employers, who could prefer to hire only those who have already shown they can stick with a dream and complete it. Remember that even most apprenticeship programs require a high school diploma or GED to get in, so earn this very important diploma

GO TO CULINARY SCHOOL
Culinary schools take one to four years, depending on the program. The most common result is the diploma, associate or bachelor’s degree – master’s culinary degrees are scarce in the United States. While formal education isn’t required to become a chef, the specialized knowledge and skills learned during the program can serve aspiring chefs in good stead when honing their kitchen work. Often those who have earned their culinary degree can quickly earn positions with greater responsibilities – always a plus for any chef.

OBTAIN PRACTICAL WORK EXPERIENCE
The formal culinary program is just the beginning. Working as a chef requires a great deal of experience, which is why fresh graduates probably won’t immediately begin working as a chef. Additional training under the tutelage of a professional chef, whether it’s through an internship or apprenticeship or simply through day-to-day work, will heighten the skills and knowledge every chef needs. As an added bonus, work experience is a great networking opportunity.

CERTIFICATION
Certification isn’t required to become a chef, but it may make it easier, especially when applying for highly competitive chef positions. Certifications may help market a chef’s cooking ability, as well as potentially lead to more opportunities for advancement. The American Culinary Federation (ACF), founded in 1929, is the largest professional chefs and cooks association in the United States, with over 17,000 members in 200 chapters nationwide. There are 14 certification designations available in five areas: Cooking Professionals; Personal Cooking Professionals; Baking and Pastry Professionals; Culinary Administrators; and Culinary Educators. Each designation is based on a candidate’s educational and work experience.

Source: http://www.learnhowtobecome.org/chef/


How restaurant tips work

It's safe to say that if you're taking a restaurant job you're not just doing it for your health. The lure of big tips and cash-in-hand is great, and something many can't refuse when weighed against other full-time and part-time jobs.

While the odds aren't great that you'll become a millionaire waiting tables, you could make a decent living at it. But that all depends on how good you are at your job. You aren't the only one depending on your ability to rake in the tips either. In most restaurants, other employees depend on the tips of waiters and waitresses to supplement their hourly wages. If that's news to you, here's some insight on how it's done:

The honor system
Not every restaurant enforces tip sharing by rule, but it's still a good idea. If you want the host to seat you with the best tables and your drinks made correctly by the bartender, it's in your best interest to recognize them for all their hard work. Recognize here is a euphemism used loosely to mean "pay." Most restaurant employees are paid small hourly wages with the idea that their salary will be augmented by wait staff. Pay them fairly out of your tips, especially if you aren't required to. Hell hath no fury like a busser scorned.

Percentages
Many restaurants require or recommend their wait staff to tip a certain percent of their tips or net sales to the various support staff. All the wait staff may be required to put in 20% of their tips, or 1% of their net sales, into a shared pot that is divided by managers between bussers, bartenders and hosts. Some state laws prohibit tip sharing to be extended to supervisors and managers, but they rarely make the list anyway.

Tip pool
Similar to percentage tipping, tip pooling has all tips from every server and bartender pooled into one pot, which is then distributed to servers and support staff based usually on percentages. Think of it as restaurant socialism; it makes sure that even when you have a bad night, it won't be that bad.

Points
Extremely popular in New York City restaurants, the point system is a little more complicated. In restaurants that use the point system, all of the tip money is pooled together. The money is then divided up with each role earning a specific number of points. Here's the math:

For the purpose of this exercise let's say that there are five servers who brought in a total of $2,000 in tips and they each earn 10 points. On the same night there are three bussers, one expo and two bartenders, and they all earn five points each.

Five Servers x 10 points (50) + three bussers x five points (15) + one expo x five points (5) + two Bartenders x five points (10) = 80 total points $2000 divided by 80 points = $25 per point.

Each server would walk away with $250 (or around 60 percent of their total tips) and all the other employees would have $125 for this shift. No matter how the restaurant you work for (or want to work for) doles out tips, the lesson here is that everyone has a role in the success or failure of any given day at a restaurant, and should be paid accordingly.

Source: http://www.snagajob.com/resources/how-restaurant-tips-work/

Good advice for new bartenders

The number one email question I get is “what should a rookie bartender know before they start their first shift?” or “what should a new bartender do to becomes successful?”. So instead of answering each question independently I figured I could put together a good summary post that will get the basics out of the way. This is also a good post for anyone that frequents a bar because it will give you some insight into what goes on behind the mahogany, or laminated press board.


1. Be a professional! You may be going through university, with no intention of being a career bartender, but that doesn’t mean you can be a slacker. You will be surprised at how many important people come through a bar. Many of these people own businesses, law firms, sports teams and anything else you can think of. If you are working your way through school, these people can be a significant asset to have when you graduate, they may even offer you a job. It’s not what you know, but who you know. People also tip better when you treat them with dignity and respect.

2. Stand Your Ground. The Food and Beverage world is an odd work environment. Most of the time the owners completely ignore the labour laws and the rights of the workers. I can almost guarantee you’ll get harassed at some point in time, especially if you are a girl. You’ll also work with a lot of people who will try to boss you around. Be strong, hold your ground and don’t let anyone push you around. Don’t be afraid to quit on the spot if you feel the work conditions aren’t to your liking. There are plenty of jobs and showing integrity and fortitude are characteristics that impress real employers. But be prepared to slog it out until you get a month or two of experience. Then start climbing the ladder to bigger and better things.

New Bartender First Shift Tips

1. Keep moving and don’t stop. There is always something to do behind a bar. That rules always applies to the rookie and the pro equally. If you can’t find anything to do, ask one of the seasoned bartenders. If you want to impress, ask for a couple of things to do, which will help you avoid pestering the bartenders all the time.

2. Stay out of the way. When the rush hits and the main bartenders get started, watch and learn, but don’t get in their way. Bartending with other people can be like a dance and everyone needs to know the steps. Since you are new, you don’t know the steps, which means you are going to be stepping on people’s feet and pissing them off. The best you can do, is to do what they tell you to do. Stock the bar, clean the bar, clear the bar.

3. Do not under any circumstances touch the tips. Most seasoned bartenders have had to deal with thieves behind the bar. Like I said, this industry is interesting and unfortunately, theft is rampant in this business. Since you are new, what you make in tips is at the courtesy of the experienced bartenders. It is their skills and experience that makes the customers happy and earns the tips. You will have to spend a little time earning their trust and respect before you will be trusted touching the money. Don’t take it personally.

4. Keep your conversations short. As a new bartender, it is easy to get stuck in a conversation with a lonely bar patron. Then you will fall behind, which won’t make anyone happy. If you need to break a conversation, walk backwards while talking to the patron until the conversation falls apart. Do what you have to do, then restart the conversation. Or be honest and say you have work to do and you’ll be right back.

Consider bartending a “trade” like a welder or pipe fitter. You don’t just walk in and become great because you stand behind the wood. It takes time and skill to develop into a professional. As you get better you will start to get the feeling that you are “in control” and it no longer feels like you are riding a mechanical bull on the highest setting. Then you will get to a point where it seems you see everything, hear everything and know everything.

Only then does it become a true joy to bartend. Then you will start to “dance” with your co-workers and it will seem like you can read their mind and predict their moves before they make them. This is because you will have the knowledge and understanding of what needs to be done and you’ll be able to do it quickly and efficiently.

Bartending is more complicated than it looks, but real pro’s make it look easy.

Source: http://www.artofdrink.com/bar/advice-for-new-bartenders

5 Tips for New Bartenders

A career in bartending can often feel a little overwhelming when you first jump into it, which is a very reasonable reaction.

Having numerous orders, drinks that require varying degrees of care while being prepared, knowing who the regulars are… The list can go on. But at the core of bartending is attitude and being able to assess your situation for what it is – you’re new. In this blog, we will offer some simple tips that all new bartenders should remember.
 
1. Be professional and ask questions
Regardless of how confident you do or don’t feel, it’s important to remember that professionalism is key. No slouching, no trying to avoid customers. Go up, ask them their order and if you don’t know how to do it, ask one of the experienced bartenders to show you how. Chances are a certain bartender will take you under his/her wing anyway and will be happy to show you the ropes.
 
2. Keep yourself busy
When you’re new to a job – especially if it’s your first bartending job – your employer may have you working quieter shifts at first. This is great for allowing you to get a feel for your job and developing your skills with less pressure, but it also means you may face less crowds and a generally quieter atmosphere. This can lead to some moments where you could have no customers.
During these times, it’s important to keep yourself busy. Ask your experienced co-workers if there are any tasks they’d like you to do – such as cleaning the bar or mopping the floor. Or, maybe you can pick their brain and ask them for some guidance on making certain drinks. What’s important is that you’re constantly proving how invested you are in your job, even if you’re only at the learning stage.
However, if your other co-workers are also busy with other mundane tasks that need to be completed when there are no customers around, ask them for a number of tasks to complete so that you don’t keep taking up their time or distracting them.
 
3. Don’t get caught up in conversation
If you have a patron who is fairly talkative, chances are they may want to have a lend of your ear to discuss anything and everything. Whether you’re invested in the conversation or listening because you know they appreciate it, it’s important not to get caught up in conversation and forget about your other duties.
When other patrons come in, politely excuse yourself from the conversation, serve them, then return to the patron you were having a conversation with. If you have other tasks that need completing, let them know and tell them you’ll be back soon. This is a trap that even experienced bartenders can get caught in because building a rapport with your customers is such an important aspect of the job – but it’s not the only aspect.
 
4. Don’t take anything personally
You’re working at a bar. Things will get busy, some patrons will get intoxicated and your co-workers may become a little more abrupt than usual when they’re in a rush from patron to patron. It’s important to not take anything your patrons or co-workers say during such times to heart.
You co-workers could be stressed – just like you could be – and intoxicated patrons could say certain things they don’t really mean. Of course if it does seem like a certain patron or co-worker is being directly malicious towards you, stay aware of it to see if this is something they continue to do over time. If this is the case, you should let your boss know. There’s a difference between temporary abruptness and outright bullying.
 
5. Be aware
Bars, clubs and pubs can shift from being quiet to a complete rush in a matter of minutes, often due to after work drinks or popular times such as happy hour. During these rushes, this is where you need to be more aware of your surroundings. Keep an eye on your patrons to make sure none of them are causing trouble. If it is also part of your bartending job to clear tables, be sure to do that. Look for spillages, broken glass or other hazards that could lead to injury.

Rush periods can be a cacophonous affair, but as long as you remain alert you’ll be helping make everyone else’s job easier.

Source: http://www.liquidsb.com.au/5-tips-for-new-bartenders/

5 Top Tips For Winning That Restaurant Job Interview

Restaurants have hit a major staffing crisis. There is a huge shortage of chefs everywhere, and front of house staff turnover rates are off the charts.

Many service staff are students or otherwise temporary workers who use their waiting positions as bridging jobs before they kick-start their chosen careers. And it's driving employers and HR managers nuts.

If you're one of the those people who is actually passionate about the hospitality industry, then you've got an advantage here. It's people like you who hospitality managers want to hire!

So how do you convey your qualification and enthusiasm for the job? Here are some tips to help you nail your next restaurant job interview.

Be Prepared

You're reading this article, which means you're already off to a good start. The most important first step is to prepare yourself for the interview.

Of course that entails knowing how long it takes you to get to the location so you show up on time. But more importantly, before that, you should have done your research.

Make sure you read the job ad carefully. Oftentimes, employers list the types of skills and personality traits they look for in a job. Use that knowledge discreetly when convincing the interviewer you're a good fit.

Also do some research about the establishment. This will help you answer the old Why do you want to work here? question. It also enables you to ask some intelligent questions at the end of the interview.

Manage Your Body Language

Body language is crucial during job interviews, because it tells the interviewer a lot about you. If you tend to get a little nervous for interviews, that's okay. There are a few tricks that can help you seem more confident and positive.

Smile when you introduce yourself, and keep a friendly tone throughout the interview.
Sit up straight. Leaning back can make you come across as bored or uninterested.
Avoid crossing your arms to keep an open posture.
Don't fidget. If you don't know what to do with your hands, just keep them in your lap or in front of you on the table.
Make eye contact when speaking to put more confidence in your words.
If you keep your posture open, positive and confident, then that tells the restaurant manager you'll be the same on the floor. This can be key to getting the job.

Provide Proof For Your Strongest Skills

If you've got experience in the restaurant industry, you probably know where you excel. Those are the skills you want to get across to your interviewer, and this is what your interviewer wants to know about.

But everyone can claim they're good at something. You will be able to set yourself apart from other applicants through the examples you use to back up your claims.

Think back to some of your success stories. Where did you get some great feedback from customers? When did customers praise you for something? What problems have you been able to fix in previous jobs?

You don't have to go over the top. Just share some tangible examples. Stories are also a really good way to convey personality, which will help you stand out from other applicants.

Compensate For Your Weaknesses

Will you do yourself a favor? When your interviewer asks about your weaknesses, will you please give a better answer than "I'm a bit of a perfectionist sometimes." That answer shows a complete lack of personality.

Don't frame a positive trait as a weakness, like "I sometimes tend to push myself a little too hard". The hiring manager will see through that. Know what your true weaknesses are, and then address them in a delicate way.

You don't have to pretend you're perfect. You just want to reassure the interviewer you don't have any shortcomings that will cause problems on the job. If you're interviewing for a sandwich hand job, it won't matter if you haven't perfected your coffee-making skills.

Anticipate Common Questions

Though some hiring managers can be really creative in their interviewing tactics, there's a good chance you'll get asked some version of these questions:

  • What's your greatest strength?
  • What's your greatest weakness?
  • What do you like about working in hospitality?
  • What do you wish you could change about it?
  • Why would you make a great addition to the team?
  • Experienced restaurant service expert David Hayden has answered these questions on his blog, which you can use as inspiration to prepare your own answers.

It's also becoming common for interviewers to ask more open-ended questions so they can find out information about your personality. Questions like that could include:

  • What is your favourite restaurant/food/drink?
  • What do you like to do in your spare time?
  • What would you do if you knew a co-worker was taking food home with them?
  • How would you respond if a customer claims they got the wrong order, and you knew for a fact that's exactly what they ordered?
  • Learn to anticipate questions. You've probably had to answer a lot of them before. Have an idea of what you want to say, but don't rehearse your answers - this may come across poorly in the interview.
Leave On A Positive Note

After you've asked the interviewer your own questions (don't skip this important step - it'll make you seem interested in the position and concerned about doing a good job), make sure you wrap up the interview on a positive note.

Even if you aren't feeling 100% confident you'll get the job at the end of the interview, keep a bright spirit. You want to convey enthusiasm for the job and an eagerness to get started with it.

Sincerely thank the interviewer for the opportunity to meet with you. Let the interviewer know you're available for any more questions. You can ask about the decision deadline here too if you want.

Leave radiating positivity, and don't be too anxious. You probably did fine. At the end of the day, nobody expects you to be perfect. 

Good luck! I hope you get the job! 

 Source: http://blog.typsy.com/5-top-tips-for-winning-that-restaurant-job

15 Common Restaurant Job Interview Questions

Everyone needs to eat. Restaurants are one of the few jobs that will never go out of business in today’s more difficult economy. As long as restaurants exist, there will be jobs available for people like you hoping to find work in a constant industry.

However, the tougher economy has affected restaurants as well. They can no longer afford to hire a bunch of employees and see which ones stay. They need to hire the right people to take on the job, so that they are not losing money due to poor customer service, theft, or turnover. Below are some possible interview questions you may face when applying for a restaurant job.

Sample Restaurant Interview Questions

What made you want to work in the restaurant industry?
Do you have any food allergies?
Tell me about a time you gave excellent customer service.
Tell me about a time you made a customer service mistake.
What do you think are the most important qualities in a server?
What made you apply here compared to other restaurants?
Are you comfortable working in a fast paced, demanding environment?
Are there any people you refuse to serve?
How would you deal with a demanding customer?
How do you feel about a customer that doesn’t leave a big tip?
How do you feel about sharing tips/tip sharing?
What are your career goals and how long do you plan on staying?
What hours are you available to work?
Do you have any mnemonic tools you use to remember orders?
Do you consider yourself a patient person?
Have you dined at our establishment before?
Expect Several Common Interview Questions

In addition to the questions above, you will be asked a lot of common interview questions (“Tell me about yourself,” etc.), and questions about the specific position and your experiences in the role (server, chef, restaurant manager, etc.). Prepare thoroughly so that you can ace the interview and beat out your competition.

Take Away Interview Tips

Thoroughly prepare for restaurant job interview questions.
Thoroughly prepare for common interview questions.

Source: http://www.everydayinterviewtips.com/15-common-restaurant-job-interview-questions/

5 Common Restaurant Interview Questions

Much like working in a restaurant itself, restaurant interviews can be unpredictable. You never know exactly what you’re going to be asked. But there are definitely certain questions that come up more frequently than others, particularly for serving positions. Before you send in your application for a restaurant gig, be sure to brush up on answers to these five common questions, and put yourself in position to land the job you want.

What is your greatest strength?
Where do you shine? What sets you apart from other people up for your position? There’s no place for modesty here. Emphasize your strengths with all the gusto you can muster. But remember, while it’s okay to push the envelope a little, never tell an outright lie. A good answer might sound something like this:

“I have enough experience in the restaurant business that very little can throw me off. Even when things get crazy, I’m able to stay cool and calm, hopefully setting an example for others. Not that I’m any less busy than my coworkers, but I know how to remain focused and get the job done.”

What is your greatest weakness?
Think of this as another opportunity to show off your strengths. With the proper wording, you can make a fault sound desirable, while at the same time still being an honest answer. This way you are still showing that you’re humble, but not hurting your chances of getting the job. One answer might be along the lines of:

“It’s probably true that I am hesitant to ask for help. I feel responsibility for my own work, and don’t like to burden others who have their own set of responsibilities. It’s something that I’m trying to work on, because I know it’s okay and often a good idea to ask a coworker for help.”

What is your favorite part of serving?
Use this question to show your employer that you know your way around a restaurant. Give an answer that uses some common restaurant terminology. Also, use this question to highlight why you want to work in a restaurant. This well let your prospective employer know you’re not just there to collect a paycheck. Here’s an answer that accomplishes what you need:

“I enjoy the constant challenge. Every day is different. Every shift has a new surprise, and I enjoy the challenge of handling them. I also like how I improve more with each one. I always handle a new situation better than the last, and I like the progress I’ve made. This also keeps the job from being boring.”

What is your least favorite part of serving?
Fight the urge to say there’s nothing you dislike. While this is the perfect answer in theory, in reality if falls flat because it’s simply not true. No job is perfect, so pick something that everyone can relate to. Some part of the restaurant business that nobody likes. That way you are being completely honest in your answer, but without sounding undesirable. Here is an answer that any restaurant worker can relate to:

“My least favorite part of serving is bad tips. Not every customer will appreciate my service as much as others. But it’s not something I can change, and I try not to take it personally. I can’t expect every customer to tip the way I would.”

The most common restaurant interview question: why would you make a good addition to the team?
Where do you fit in? Serving is a team effort, so your prospective employer needs to know that can work well with others. They also need to know that you can integrate yourself quickly into your new role. Give an answer that explains how much you value teamwork, and that you can fit in quickly. Here is an answer that fulfills both criteria:

“I’m a team player and a quick learner. Each shift I will try to contribute more to help my coworkers than I ask in return. I think I can still learn a few things from the servers already here, but also hope that I can contribute a bit as well. I hope that as I improve my own skills, others will improve theirs as well.” 

Remember to ask yourself these restaurant interview questions before going into the interview. Having a reasonable answer for these questions increases your chances of being hired as a server. If you feel like you would hire yourself, then your prospective employer should as well. And if you need help landing interviews, try a trusted resume and cover letter builder like the one offered by LiveCareer. With a better resume and cover letter, you’ll approach interviews with added confidence--and be more ready to attack those tough questions! 

Source: https://www.livecareer.com/interview-tips/industry/restaurant

Server’s Bible: 101 Tips How To Be A Good Restaurant Waiter

Tips about how to be a good waiter, starting from greeting to customers to seeing them out, were very nicely presented by Bruce Bushel. His 101 tips for restaurant servers have become a sort of a “Server’s Bible”

Rules of good serving are reflections of tradition, culture, and respect to customer and your restaurant profession. The rules are very old and new ones don’t need to be invented. I believe that after reading these simple tips about what you should not do as a waiter you will certainly make your customer and yourself happier.

This is the list of 100 Things Restaurant Staffers Should Never Do wrote by Bruce Bushel that was published in The New York Times:

WAITER GURU

A treasury of hundreds of quick, practical, and easy-to-read tips and strategies Want a Free Sample?
1. Do not let anyone enter the restaurant without a warm greeting.

2. Do not make a singleton feel bad. Do not say, “Are you waiting for someone?” Ask for a reservation. Ask if he or she would like to sit at the bar.

3. Never refuse to seat three guests because a fourth has not yet arrived.
4. If a table is not ready within a reasonable length of time, offer a free drink and/or amuse-bouche. The guests may be tired and hungry and thirsty, and they did everything right.

5. Tables should be level without anyone asking. Fix it before guests are seated.

6. Do not lead the witness with, “Bottled water or just tap?” Both are fine. Remain neutral.

7. Do not announce your name. No jokes, no flirting, no cuteness.

8. Do not interrupt a conversation. For any reason. Especially not to recite specials. Wait for the right moment.

9. Do not recite the specials too fast or robotically or dramatically. It is not a soliloquy. This is not an audition.

10. Do not inject your personal favorites when explaining the specials.

11. Do not hustle the lobsters. That is, do not say, “We only have two lobsters left.” Even if there are only two lobsters left.

12. Do not touch the rim of a water glass. Or any other glass.

13. Handle wine glasses by their stems and silverware by the handles.

14. When you ask, “How’s everything?” or “How was the meal?” listen to the answer and fix whatever is not right.

15. Never say “I don’t know” to any question without following with, “I’ll find out.”

16. If someone requests more sauce or gravy or cheese, bring a side dish of same. No pouring. Let them help themselves.

17. Do not take an empty plate from one guest while others are still eating the same course. Wait, wait, wait.

18. Know before approaching a table who has ordered what. Do not ask, “Who’s having the shrimp?”

19. Offer guests butter and/or olive oil with their bread.

20. Never refuse to substitute one vegetable for another.

21. Never serve anything that looks creepy or runny or wrong.

22. If someone is unsure about a wine choice, help him. That might mean sending someone else to the table or offering a taste or two.

23. If someone likes a wine, steam the label off the bottle and give it to the guest with the bill. It has the year, the vintner, the importer, etc.

24. Never use the same glass for a second drink.

25. Make sure the glasses are clean. Inspect them before placing them on the table.

26. Never assume people want their white wine in an ice bucket. Inquire.

27. For red wine, ask if the guests want to pour their own or prefer the waiter to pour.

28. Do not put your hands all over the spout of a wine bottle while removing the cork.

29. Do not pop a champagne cork. Remove it quietly, gracefully. The less noise the better.

30. Never let the wine bottle touch the glass into which you are pouring. No one wants to drink the dust or dirt from the bottle.

31. Never remove a plate full of food without asking what went wrong. Obviously, something went wrong.

32. Never touch a customer. No excuses. Do not do it. Do not brush them, move them, wipe them or dust them.

33. Do not bang into chairs or tables when passing by.

34. Do not have a personal conversation with another server within earshot of customers.

35. Do not eat or drink in plain view of guests.

36. Never reek from perfume or cigarettes. People want to smell the food and beverage.

37. Do not drink alcohol on the job, even if invited by the guests. “Not when I’m on duty” will suffice.

38.Do not call a guy a “dude.”

39. Do not call a woman “lady.”

40. Never say, “Good choice,” implying that other choices are bad.

41. Saying, “No problem” is a problem. It has a tone of insincerity or sarcasm. “My pleasure” or “You’re welcome” will do.

42. Do not compliment a guest’s attire or hairdo or makeup. You are insulting someone else.

43. Never mention what your favorite dessert is. It’s irrelevant.

44. Do not discuss your own eating habits, be you vegan or lactose intolerant or diabetic.

45. Do not curse, no matter how young or hip the guests.

46. Never acknowledge any one guest over and above any other. All guests are equal.

47. Do not gossip about co-workers or guests within earshot of guests.

48. Do not ask what someone is eating or drinking when they ask for more; remember or consult the order.

49. Never mention the tip, unless asked.

50. Do not turn on the charm when it’s tip time. Be consistent throughout.

51. If there is a service charge, alert your guests when you present the bill. It’s not a secret or a trick.

52. Know your menu inside and out. If you serve Balsam Farm candy-striped beets, know something about Balsam Farm and candy-striped beets.

53. Do not let guests double-order unintentionally; remind the guest who orders ratatouille that zucchini comes with the entree.

54. If there is a prix fixe, let guests know about it. Do not force anyone to ask for the “special” menu.

55. Do not serve an amuse-bouche without detailing the ingredients. Allergies are a serious matter; peanut oil can kill. (This would also be a good time to ask if anyone has any allergies.)

56. Do not ignore a table because it is not your table. Stop, look, listen, lend a hand. (Whether tips are pooled or not.)

57. Bring the pepper mill with the appetizer. Do not make people wait or beg for a condiment.

58. Do not bring judgment with the ketchup. Or mustard. Or hot sauce. Or whatever condiment is requested.

59. Do not leave place settings that are not being used.

60. Bring all the appetizers at the same time, or do not bring the appetizers. Same with entrees and desserts.

61. Do not stand behind someone who is ordering. Make eye contact. Thank him or her.

62. Do not fill the water glass every two minutes, or after each sip. You’ll make people nervous.

62(a). Do not let a glass sit empty for too long.

63. Never blame the chef or the busboy or the hostess or the weather for anything that goes wrong. Just make it right.

64. Specials, spoken and printed, should always have prices.

65. Always remove used silverware and replace it with new.

66. Do not return to the guest anything that falls on the floor — be it napkin, spoon, menu or soy sauce.

67. Never stack the plates on the table. They make a racket. Shhhhhh.

68. Do not reach across one guest to serve another.

69. If a guest is having trouble making a decision, help out. If someone wants to know your life story, keep it short. If someone wants to meet the chef, make an effort.

70. Never deliver a hot plate without warning the guest. And never ask a guest to pass along that hot plate.

71. Do not race around the dining room as if there is a fire in the kitchen or a medical emergency. (Unless there is a fire in the kitchen or a medical emergency.)

72. Do not serve salad on a freezing cold plate; it usually advertises the fact that it has not been freshly prepared.

73. Do not bring soup without a spoon. Few things are more frustrating than a bowl of hot soup with no spoon.

74. Let the guests know the restaurant is out of something before the guests read the menu and order the missing dish.

75. Do not ask if someone is finished when others are still eating that course.

76. Do not ask if a guest is finished the very second the guest is finished. Let guests digest, savor, reflect.

77. Do not disappear.

78. Do not ask, “Are you still working on that?” Dining is not working — until questions like this are asked.

79. When someone orders a drink “straight up,” determine if he wants it “neat” — right out of the bottle — or chilled. Up is up, but “straight up” is debatable.

80. Never insist that a guest settles up at the bar before sitting down; transfer the tab.

81. Know what the bar has in stock before each meal.

82. If you drop or spill something, clean it up, replace it, offer to pay for whatever damage you may have caused. Refrain from touching the wet spots on the guest.

83. Ask if your guest wants his coffee with dessert or after. Same with an after-dinner drink.

84. Do not refill a coffee cup compulsively. Ask if the guest desires a refill.

84(a). Do not let an empty coffee cup sit too long before asking if a refill is desired.

85. Never bring a check until someone asks for it. Then give it to the person who asked for it.

86. If a few people signal for the check, find a neutral place on the table to leave it.

87. Do not stop your excellent service after the check is presented or paid.

88. Do not ask if a guest needs change. Just bring the change.

89. Never patronize a guest who has a complaint or suggestion; listen, take it seriously, address it.

90. If someone is getting agitated or effusive on a cellphone, politely suggest he keep it down or move away from other guests.

91. If someone complains about the music, do something about it, without upsetting the ambiance. (The music is not for the staff — it’s for the customers.)

92. Never play a radio station with commercials or news or talking of any kind.

93. Do not play brass — no brassy Broadway songs, brass bands, marching bands, or big bands that feature brass, except a muted flugelhorn.

94. Do not play an entire CD of any artist. If someone doesn’t like Frightened Rabbit or Michael Bublé, you have just ruined a meal.

95. Never hover long enough to make people feel they are being watched or hurried, especially when they are figuring out the tip or signing for the check.

96. Do not say anything after a tip — be it good, bad, indifferent — except, “Thank you very much.”

97. If a guest goes gaga over a particular dish, get the recipe for him or her.

98. Do not wear too much makeup or jewelry. You know you have too much jewelry when it jingles and/or draws comments.

99. Do not show frustration. Your only mission is to serve. Be patient. It is not easy.

100. Guests, like servers, come in all packages. Show a “good table” your appreciation with a free glass of port, a plate of biscotti or something else management approves.

Bonus Track: As Bill Gates has said, “Your most unhappy customers are your greatest source of learning.”

Tips about how to be a good waiter, starting from greeting to customers to seeing them out, were very nicely presented by Bruce Bushel. His 101 tips for restaurant servers have become a sort of a “Server’s Bible”

Rules of good serving are reflections of tradition, culture, and respect to customer and your restaurant profession. The rules are very old and new ones don’t need to be invented. I believe that after reading these simple tips about what you should not do as a waiter you will certainly make your customer and yourself happier.

Know Tip Policies Before You Take a New Restaurant Job

Waiters love tips -- so long as they're the ones collecting them. But when it comes to sharing tips with fellow restaurant colleagues, or tipping out, some members of the wait staff aren't so enthusiastic.

Tipping out and other policies vary from restaurant to restaurant and can have a sizeable impact on a waiter's take-home cash. Open tipping, which allows diners to tip as much or as little as they wish, or fixed-rate tipping, which applies a service charge to all bills, can change the servers' experience in the dining room.

It's All About the Tips

Tipping is at the heart of your job as a waiter. In some ways, it's how you measure your performance. It lends a certain excitement to the job and often contributes to the lion's share of your money. If not for tips, why would someone who typically makes less per hour than it costs to buy a gallon of gas continue in the industry? The New Yorker reported in 2005 that restaurant workers in the United States collectively make $25 billion a year in tips.

But the money left on the table for a job well done gets deposited in more pockets than just those of the wait staff. It may go to bus people, bartenders, dish washers and even the chef, depending on the restaurant.

Different Restaurants, Different Policies

Waiters at The Wolf's Lair Restaurant in Dobson, North Carolina, might pull in $24 in tips per table on a weekend night shift and see upwards of 150 diners in the restaurant. But a bus boy gets a cut on Friday and Saturday nights.

"We pay him $10 to $15 per waiter at the end of the night to make sure he's taken care of," says Chad Easter, waiter at the restaurant. "The way we look at it is if we take care of him, he'll take care of us." A flat-rate tipping policy changes the front-of-the-house and back-of-the-house relationships, with reduced disparity in potential income and less dependence on wait-staff performance. The same is true for tipping out bartenders.

At Evans Street Station in Tecumseh, Michigan, bus staff receives 2.5 percent of servers' net sales, and the bartender receives $1 for every $25 a server sells -- both come from the waiter's tips. There's no payout to the kitchen staff.

That's the way it has been since Evans Street Station opened, according to Justin Yovanov, general manager. He reports it's more likely the wait staff will tip out the kitchen staff if a chef owns the restaurant to better compensate the staff for its efforts.

According to Easter, a chef-owner is also more likely to require tipping out back-of-the-house staff if the chef is paid hourly.

European Flat-Rate Tipping Arrives in the US

A debate rages between front-of-the-house servers, who feel they earn every penny of tip money, and-behind-the scenes workers, who also want to be compensated for the work they do, about setting a flat rate for tips on all checks to be distributed evenly among the staff. The fixed service charge, or flat-rate tip, is popular in Europe but receives mixed reviews here. In some operations, flat-rate tipping is becoming standard.

Last fall, Thomas Keller, a chef who has opened successful restaurants including The French Laundry in Napa, decided to institute a flat-rate tip at Per Se in New York City. It's designed to level the playing field among all employees and give behind-the-scenes workers a leg up in the business, according to Keller.

All the various tipping policies have advocates and detractors. Be sure you know your restaurant's policy before starting a new job. If you're in it for the money, you'll want to understand not only how you'll be tipped, but also if you'll be expected to share.

By Jamie Popp

Job Interview Don'ts to land a hospitality job

  • Don't arrive too early. Make sure you respect your interviewers schedule
  • Answer questions with a simple 'yes' or 'no'. Use the CAR Technique (Context, Action, Result) wherever possible. Share things about yourself relating to the position.
  • Lie. Always answer questions truthfully, frankly and as concisely as possible.
  • Ever make derogatory remarks about your present or former employers, colleagues or companies.
  • 'Over-answer' questions. The interviewer may steer the conversation into politics or economics. It is best to answer the questions honestly, saying no more than is necessary.
  • Let your discouragement show. If you get the impression the interview is not going well and you have already been rejected, don't show discouragement or alarm. Occasionally an interviewer who is genuinely interested in you may seem to discourage you in order to test your reaction.
  • Ask about salary, bonuses or holidays at the first interview - unless you are positive the employer is interested in hiring you and raises the issue first. However, know your market value and be prepared to specify your required salary or range.

4 Job Search Tips That People Forget

Get noticed above the rest with these 4 tips so basic that people forget about them.

1. Make Yourself an Obvious Fit

Study the job description and any available information you have on the position. Are you mirroring the words and phrases in the job description? Are you showcasing your strengths in the areas that seem to be of paramount importance to this role? Line it up. Line it up.

2. Don’t Limit Yourself to Online Applications

By lining up with people on the inside of the companies at which you want to work, you will instantly set yourself apart. Decision makers interview people who come recommended or by way of a personal referral before they start sorting through the blob of resumes that arrives by way of the applicant tracking system.

3. Remember That Your Resume (and LinkedIn Profile) Is Not a Tattoo

If you’re a covert job seeker, remember to turn off your activity broadcasts (within privacy and settings) when you make edits to your LinkedIn profile. If your current boss or colleagues are connected to you on LinkedIn, they may get suspicious about all the frequent changes.

4. Thank You Matters

Consider crafting, original, genuine thank you notes (one for each interviewer) the moment you get back to a computer, following the interview. The speed with which you send the notes, and the quality, will make an impact.

How restaurant tips work

It's safe to say that if you're taking a restaurant job you're not just doing it for your health. The lure of big tips and cash-in-hand is great, and something many can't refuse when weighed against other full-time and part-time jobs.

While the odds aren't great that you'll become a millionaire waiting tables, you could make a decent living at it. But that all depends on how good you are at your job. You aren't the only one depending on your ability to rake in the tips either. In most restaurants, other employees depend on the tips of waiters and waitresses to supplement their hourly wages. If that's news to you, here's some insight on how it's done:

The honor system
Not every restaurant enforces tip sharing by rule, but it's still a good idea. If you want the host to seat you with the best tables and your drinks made correctly by the bartender, it's in your best interest to recognize them for all their hard work. Recognize here is a euphemism used loosely to mean "pay." Most restaurant employees are paid small hourly wages with the idea that their salary will be augmented by wait staff. Pay them fairly out of your tips, especially if you aren't required to. Hell hath no fury like a busser scorned.

Percentages
Many restaurants require or recommend their wait staff to tip a certain percent of their tips or net sales to the various support staff. All the wait staff may be required to put in 20% of their tips, or 1% of their net sales, into a shared pot that is divided by managers between bussers, bartenders and hosts. Some state laws prohibit tip sharing to be extended to supervisors and managers, but they rarely make the list anyway.

Tip pool
Similar to percentage tipping, tip pooling has all tips from every server and bartender pooled into one pot, which is then distributed to servers and support staff based usually on percentages. Think of it as restaurant socialism; it makes sure that even when you have a bad night, it won't be that bad.

Points
Extremely popular in New York City restaurants, the point system is a little more complicated. In restaurants that use the point system, all of the tip money is pooled together. The money is then divided up with each role earning a specific number of points. Here's the math:

For the purpose of this exercise let's say that there are five servers who brought in a total of $2,000 in tips and they each earn 10 points. On the same night there are three bussers, one expo and two bartenders, and they all earn five points each.

Five Servers x 10 points (50) + three bussers x five points (15) + one expo x five points (5) + two Bartenders x five points (10) = 80 total points $2000 divided by 80 points = $25 per point.

Each server would walk away with $250 (or around 60 percent of their total tips) and all the other employees would have $125 for this shift. No matter how the restaurant you work for (or want to work for) doles out tips, the lesson here is that everyone has a role in the success or failure of any given day at a restaurant, and should be paid accordingly.


Source: Amy White

Top 9 Popular Interview Questions

Question 1. “Tell me about yourself?”

The broad nature of this question makes it difficult to answer in a quick and relevant fashion. If the context is not clear, you need to find out more about what the interviewer is hoping to learn about you by asking such a question. In such a situation you could ask, “Is there a particular aspect of my background that you would like me to elaborate on?” to help you to find the appropriate focus and avoid pointless rambling. Whichever way you decide to answer this question, make sure that your answer ultimately conveys some relevance to your professional aspirations and achievements. Your answer should also demonstrate, or refer to, one or more of your key qualities or achievements in action – for example honesty, integrity, being a team player, etc.

Amusing anecdotes that also highlight the above qualities can also be an effective way of answering this question. In short, your answer should make the connection between both your personal and professional lives, such as, “I put my heart into everything I do, whether it be sports or work. I find that getting along with team mates – or professional peers – makes life more enjoyable and productive.”

Question 2. “Why do you want to work here?”

To suitably answer this question you will need to have researched the company and the position you are applying for. It is also important to emphasize the attributes of the company that you see both on their website and when you enter the building.

Also, cap your answer with reference to your belief that the company can provide you with a stable and productive work environment and that such an atmosphere will encourage your best work – “I’m not just looking for another pay check. I enjoy my work and I know that your company has an excellent reputation. I also share the values that make this possible, which should enable me to fit in and complement the team”.

Question 3. “Why should I hire you?”

This answer should be short and to the point. It should highlight the areas of your background and experience that relate to current needs and problems. It can also be a good idea to recap the interviewer’s description of the job and describe in detail why you satisfy that criteria.

Finish your answer along the lines of, “I have the skills you need [itemize them], I’m a team player, I take direction and I am motivated to be productive member of this company”.

Question 4. “What did you like/dislike about your last job?”

At this stage the interviewer is looking for compatibility issues. If a trial lawyer says he/she dislikes arguing a point with colleagues, such a statement will only weaken – if not immediately destroy – his/her candidacy. Most interviewers start the initial interview with an introductory statement about the company. Pay attention; that information will help you answer the question. In fact, any statement the interviewer makes about the job or corporation can be used to your advantage.

Criticizing a prior employer or employee can be a read flag for the interviewer that you might be a problem. Keep your answer short and positive. As a rule of thumb, you are allowed only one negative about past employers, and only then if your interviewer has a “hot button” about his/her department or company. For example, the only thing your past employer could not offer was “the ability to contribute more in different areas”. Then you can continue with, “I really liked everything about the job. The reason I want to leave is to find a position where I can make a greater contribution. You see, I work for a large corporation that encourages specialization of skills. Working here, in a smaller environment, will allow me to contribute far more in different areas.” Tell them what they want to hear – replay the hot button.

On the flip side, if you interview with a large company, something like “I work for a small company and don’t get the time to specialize in one or two major areas” will be just as effective.

Question 5. “What would you like to be doing five years from now?”

When answering this question, it is important to remember that all roles these days require teamwork and communication. These two skills, and the behaviors that emanate from developing them, will allow you to broaden your opportunities in your work environment.

The safest answer to this question is focused around a desire to be regarded as a qualified professional and team player.

Question 6. “What are your biggest accomplishments?”

It is important to keep this answer job related. If you don’t want to sound too modest, you may begin your reply with: “although I feel my biggest accomplishments are still ahead of me, I am proud of my involvement in… when I made my contribution as part of that team and learned a lot in the process”.

Question 7. “Can you work under pressure?”

It can be tempting to give a simple “yes” or “no” answer to this one, but this reveals nothing and you will lose the opportunity to sell your skills and values. Actually, this question often comes from an unskilled interviewer, because it is closed-ended, meaning it does not give you the chance to elaborate. Something along the lines of, “Yes, I usually find it stimulating. However, I believe in planning and proper management of my time”, is suitable and effective.

Question 8. “How do you take direction?”

The interviewer wants to know if you are open-minded and can be a team player. This type of question can also be seen as, “how do you accept criticism?”. Your answer should cover both areas; “I take direction well and recognize that it can come in a variety of different forms. I think it’s important to accept all direction and criticism as there are always other considerations I am not aware of and taking on such advice will allow me to grow as a professional.”

Question 9. “Do you prefer working with others or alone?”

This question is usually to determine if you are a team player. Before answering, however, be sure you know whether the job requires you to work alone – then respond appropriately.

Source: http://www.frontlinerecruitmentgroup.com/au/hospitality/9-popular-interview-questions/

Job Interview Do's to land a hospitality job

Preparing for a job interview is essential to making a good impression. Employ these handy job interview techniques to win over your interviewer:

  • Plan to arrive on time or a few minutes early. Late arrival for a job interview is never excusable.
  • Greet the interviewer by their first name.
  • Wait until you are offered a chair before sitting. Sit upright and always look alert and interested. Be a good listener as well as a good talker. Smile!
  • Maintain eye contact.
  • Follow the interviewer's leads but try to get them to describe the position and duties early in the interview so you can relate your background and skills to the position.
  • Make sure you convey your good points factually and sincerely. Keep in mind that you alone can sell yourself to an interviewer. Make them realise why they need you in their organisation.
  • Always conduct yourself as if you are determined to get the job. Never close the door on an opportunity. It is better to be free to choose from a number of jobs rather than only one.
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